CSS

OpenID, Nofollow removed, Comment counts, and IE7 fixes

I’m added a few features to the site: OpenID support: Instead of typing your name and e-mail you could instead sign in with an OpenID-enabled URL. Or you could completely ignore it, and go on as usual. Nofollow restriction removed: WordPress by default adds rel=”nofollow” to all links that people write in comments. It’s a…

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CSS

IE7 hover bug: z-index ignored (and other properties)

I’m implementing a rather different design right now for an intranet, and have found a bug I thought you’d like to know about. If you restyle things with :hover, you might have to add an extra property for the rule to be applied in IE7. How is this design different? Well, it built on columns…

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CSS

Yellow fade with CSS and a simple image

Via Think Vitamin I find a cool way to highlight the current element. Lots of people do this by calling some kind of javascript library, it’s so common it’s been dubbed the yellow fade technique. But javascript isn’t really needed, you just need CSS and an image. First: you can jump to any id on…

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Django – the fun framework (presentation)

Yesterday I attended the excellent Geek Meet hosted by Robert Nyman at the Creuna office. I held a presentation about the Django web framework, and took some time today to add some comments in english and make a PDF-file of the presentation. Would you like to know why Django is more fun than what you’re…

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Ten commandments of update services

I’m getting increasingly annoyed with update services shipped with popular applications. It’s looks like it’s getting worse and worse, and I think someone should stand up and say enough is enough. Adobe Update Google Update Microsoft Update Ten Commandments of Update Services Let me start by showing when updates go wrong: Adobe Update I start…

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CSS

The Open Web: Can it deliver?

It’s ringing through my head as Microsoft releases Silverlight, as Adobe forces another version of Flash or Air, and as Sun tries to push JavaFX into the spotlight. It’s a dark whisper when I read how many still use old browsers (hello IE6!), or when I see Javascript being used poorly by otherwise knowledgeable programmers….

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7 silliest W3C specs ever published

W3C is producing lots and lots of good specifications and we seriously have their joined effort to thank for a lot of today’s web. But everything released by them isn’t all nice. I’ve digged deep into obscure search results to find, that’s right, the silliest specifications ever. *Drumroll*. HTML+TIME: Why not add timers to HTML?…

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Google Reader subscriptions on a WordPress Page

Instead of posting new lists of blogs I follow over and over again I thought I’d make a permanent place for them. So I just exported all of the blogs I follow from Google Reader (Settings -> Import/Export) and imported them to WordPress (Write -> Links -> Import Links (in the sidebar)). OPML is a…

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CSS

Why adding variables to CSS is a good thing

Via Simon Willison I find that Bert Bos, one of the creators of CSS, has written an article on why variables shouldn’t be included in CSS3. I thought I’d try to explain why I think they should. Professional perspective Bert posts statistics of stylesheet usage from the W3C site, and means that most stylesheets are…

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Don’t waste time writing HTML and CSS

When you’ve worked with front-end development for a while, you start thinking about effectiveness. So without further ado, here’s my four best ways to be a more effective front-end developer. Feel free to add more ideas as comments! 1. Do you need HTML or CSS for this? Lots of times when I get stranded on…

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CSS

Upside down text with CSS

Previously I’ve talked about reversing text with CSS by simply setting a few CSS attributes. Today we will try another trick: turning text upside down. It’s actually possible using a simple CSS property and works cross-browser today. The property to use it “text-gravity” with a value of “inverse”. write upside down text … and this…

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CSS

Feed readers should show comments

One thing I’ve noticed lately is that I read fewer comments. It isn’t that strange really: I read blogs using a feed reader and it doesn’t show a links to comments. I see a couple of reasons why comments are not cared for in feed readers: Why not #1: Feeds are meant to be fast…

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Avlyssna befolkningen (Swedish)

(Eng: Sorry for writing this in swedish. Sweden is about to pass a law allowing the government to wiretap its citizens and I need to add a few things to the debate. The rest is in Swedish) Sverige kommer på onsdag högst troligen rösta igenom ett lagändring om att FRA ska få avlyssna internet, istället…

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Sharepoint 2007 – insanely bad HTML

Sharepoint 2007 continues to amaze me with its terrible interface code. This is code you stumble over all over the place, both in places where you can hack your way around them, and in places where you just have to live with them. Some things are very hard to live with, let me show you:…

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CSS

New theme up for friendlybit.com

Hi! If you’re reading this blog through your feed reader, today is a good day to break out of it and have a look at the site. There’s been several little changes throughout, and I invite you to click around and explore things. Let me know if you find anything broken! Comments have moved up…

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Use formats instead of microformats

The Semantic Web continues to break new ground, and Web 3.0 seems to be a term that people associate with it. In the backwaters of semantics, microformats aims to develop standards to embed semantic information into XHTML. I can’t help to think that’s strange. One of the principles of microformats is to “design for humans…

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Web standards with ASP.NET

Good interface code is a mix of CSS and HTML, and while most frameworks offer full control over the CSS, they rarely offer that for HTML. This article looks at how ASP.NET developers can help their interface developers gain that control. Disclaimer: I’m no .NET expert, but too few people write about this stuff, so…

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MSN blocks YouTube links

I’m not sure if there’s some kind of big power struggle going on right now, but obviously MSN is blocking strings containing “www.youtube.com”. It started by me finding a funny youtube video (who didn’t?), and tried sending it to a friend. Message back was that “Message could not be sent because of a network error”….

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Why the class name “wrapper” is so common

We’ve all heard about how bad it is to use “left” and “yellow” as class names and ids. If you name an element “left”, and then decide to move that element to the right, you have to go through all your pages and change that name. Too much work. If you instead had called it…

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Top 3 articles of friendlybit.com (according to me)

Robert taunted me cause my blog was to inactive, so I thought I’d write something. As you might imagine, pushing me terribly to be creative like that isn’t a good way to get good posts up, so I thought I’d just point to some existing articles instead. The selection is not based on popularity, ratings,…

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