HTML5 is not an option

HTML5 is HOT! Developers all over the world are adapting their sites, browsers are catching up, and new fallback solutions are released every day. But many developers misunderstand one thing: You can’t choose to use HTML5 or not, your site will be parsed as HTML5 no matter what. The reason is simple, HTML5 is made…

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Rendering a web page – step by step

Have you ever thought about what happens when you surf the web? It’s not as simple as it seems: You type an URL into address bar in your preferred browser. The browser parses the URL to find the protocol, host, port, and path. It forms a HTTP request (that was most likely the protocol) To…

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Tapestry 5, and how not to treat HTML

I’ve previously written about how Microsoft Sharepoint mistreats HTML, and makes it look a whole other language. But truth to be told, Sharepoint (and .NET for that matter) isn’t the only framework that can’t handle HTML. I’ve recently worked with a Java framework called Tapestry 5, and it’s really bad in some respects too (though…

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Interface developers and security

You live in a new era, when demanding that people register on your site is no longer enough. There’s far too many other sites out that that you’re already a member of, you don’t need another one. You need to trust people. You also want people to contribute to your sites with content somehow. Text…

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HTML includes

One of the first questions beginners ask when starting to learn HTML is how to do includes. They seldom know that includes is what they are asking about, but instead feels bad when having to copy and paste that same menu HTML each time they want a new page. “Do I have to type the…

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Templated User Controls in ASP.NET

Good design repeats itself. It works hard to convey a whole, a feeling of consistency. Once you understand a part of such a design, you know your way around all of it. This is often done by repetition, using the same elements, colors, styles, positioning, and so on. This is a good thing. Good code…

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Don’t waste time writing HTML and CSS

When you’ve worked with front-end development for a while, you start thinking about effectiveness. So without further ado, here’s my four best ways to be a more effective front-end developer. Feel free to add more ideas as comments! 1. Do you need HTML or CSS for this? Lots of times when I get stranded on…

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Sharepoint 2007 – insanely bad HTML

Sharepoint 2007 continues to amaze me with its terrible interface code. This is code you stumble over all over the place, both in places where you can hack your way around them, and in places where you just have to live with them. Some things are very hard to live with, let me show you:…

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Use formats instead of microformats

The Semantic Web continues to break new ground, and Web 3.0 seems to be a term that people associate with it. In the backwaters of semantics, microformats aims to develop standards to embed semantic information into XHTML. I can’t help to think that’s strange. One of the principles of microformats is to “design for humans…

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Web standards with ASP.NET

Good interface code is a mix of CSS and HTML, and while most frameworks offer full control over the CSS, they rarely offer that for HTML. This article looks at how ASP.NET developers can help their interface developers gain that control. Disclaimer: I’m no .NET expert, but too few people write about this stuff, so…

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Why the class name “wrapper” is so common

We’ve all heard about how bad it is to use “left” and “yellow” as class names and ids. If you name an element “left”, and then decide to move that element to the right, you have to go through all your pages and change that name. Too much work. If you instead had called it…

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IE8 is back on the standards track

Yesterday the Internet Explorer Team showed a big change in attitude. Listening to developer feedback about IE8, they changed their mind, and now IE8 will render standards mode pages using the latest and greatest it can offer. This is not only a sane way to approach standards, but it’s also a way to say “We’re…

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Default HTML in Sharepoint 2007

As I’ve said before, I’ve been spending time with Sharepoint 2007 recently. The HTML it produces is really bad, and today I thought I show you just how bad. Sharepoint 2007 has been “updated” to support masterpages, a concept from .NET 2.0. Sharepoint’s implementation of masterpages has several problems, but none of them even come…

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IE8 and Doctype switching

The topic of this week has been IE8s new rendering mode, and the strange way to trigger it. As usual, I’ve decided not to comment right away, and instead first read what others are saying and try to form an opinion. I believe the best articles that talks about the switch are these: Legacy, by…

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Sharepoint 2007 from an interface developer’s view

Like Cameron Moll (Skinning Sharepoint and Pointedly unskinnable), I’ve been working with Sharepoint 2007 (aka MOSS) recently, and I hope you don’t mind me posting a few articles about my work here. I’ve found far too few blog posts that really go to the depth in explaining how things really work. I’ll try to do…

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I’m an interface developer

In his latest post Roger Johansson asks the question Are we designers or developers?. I have a simple answer for that. None of them. Let me explain: First we have these people calling themselves developers. And boy do they know programming… and math… and… no that’s all. Many have a masters degree in computer science,…

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What italic means

Finally an image that dispells all myths about the element. As you can see it’s all about presentation. Disappear you foul demon! (You have more HTML humor? Show me in the comments)

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Don’t attach HTML-files in Outlook

Just a short word of warning. I thought I’d mail the min-/max-width template to a colleague at work. So I fired up Outlook, attached the file and sent it. I thought that was it, Outlook couldn’t get something simple like that wrong, could it? Yes it could! Opening the file I found some pretty nasty…

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Accessibility as a platform to build upon

Two things triggered this post. First a brave participant at the last Geek Meet stood up and asked the question: “Why isn’t it ok to require users have javascript enabled?”. A few days afterwards I got a lot of good replies to my article about AJAX vs. Flash, claiming that users want multimedia, not plain…

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Separation in the blink of an eye

I’ve seen them so many times: pages where the HTML is mighty fine (!) but the CSS looks like it’s taken straight from Dreamweaver. While I hate having to deal with those kinds of designs there is something good about them. They prove the point that HTML and CSS are two separate units, and that…

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